Dream Job…and My Title Would Be Chief Dream Merchant

What I want:

An arts charity that makes my community better.

Value to the community:

Safety. Knowledge. Personal Power. Issue solutions.

Artistic Tools:

Provocation. Entertainment. Populism. Progressiveness. Mischief.

Other Tools:

Educational residencies in both art and topic. 

Partners:

Every other charity, educational institution, or NGO with similar values.

Differentiation:

50-50 split on revenues with partners. Partners open their mailing lists to help themselves financially through ticket sales.

Quantifiable outcomes:

The measured outcomes of the partners. Quantity of classes, students, and schools participating.

Non-quantifiable outcomes:

Populist results defeat the arts’ elitist reputation.  The needs of the charities are filled.

Initial budget:

Enough so that all artists receive at least $15/hour (in 2014 dollars) and no full-time hourly rate is more than 4x anyone else’s.

Impact:

Arts moves people to action.  Thorny issues seen can never be unseen.  Life is better.

Advertisements

One response

  1. Reblogged this on Coach Stalter and commented:
    As an experienced nonprofit management consultant, I have been involved with cultural programs and initiatives across the country that have served as important drivers

    for the recovery of economic development in cities of varying population and budget size. I continue to find Amy Poehler’s advice to be true: “As you navigate through

    the rest of your life, be open to collaboration. Other people and other people’s ideas are often better than your own. Find a group of people who challenge and inspire

    you, spend a lot of time with them, and it will change your life.”

    Since relocating to Las Vegas from NYC just 4 years ago, I have come to know many of our local nonprofit cultural organizations and their staff leadership – “who

    challenge and inspire me”! However, I can’t tell you how often I have heard the following sentiments:

    • “All we ever do is talk, and nothing gets done!”
    • “When are we going to do something?”
    • “We need solutions, not more questions!”
    • “We’ve heard all this before, and nothing changes! We need productive outcomes!”

    As a native of Pittsburgh, PA, I take great pride in The Pittsburgh Cultural Trust. They continue to be my model for empowering nonprofits with the capacity to build productive relationships, and to promote the development of partnerships and social enterprises to secure enduring dividends for both the participating nonprofit partners and the communities which they serve.

    So, as the Executive Director of the Clark County Theatre Center (CCTC), I am working to galvanize local nonprofit performing arts organizations – who might otherwise

    be in competition for space, audiences, funding and other resources – to work together to attend not only to personal interests but also to outcomes benefitting the

    whole.

    Collaboration is a great way to address complex challenges, since it has the potential to tap communal creativity and unleash true innovation and buy-in. Many of the

    adaptive challenges facing nonprofit organizations today require people to change the way they work, generate solutions and engage stakeholders. They call for our

    human capacity to be greater than the sum of its parts. The eight arts organizations already committed as anchor tenants place artists and art at the center of CCTC

    planning, execution and activity, and leverages the creative potential already present among these organizations.

    However, I see no reason to limit such an effort to just these eight CCTC anchor tenants. I believe that the “Las Vegas Cultural Trust” (my working title) holds the

    potential to be transformative for the community, with the added expectation that including more stakeholders will broaden the CCTC appeal, allowing for a greater

    chance to create opportunities for people of all income levels and backgrounds to thrive in place.

    “The world shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” [Anais Nin]

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: