Tag Archives: advertising

Feedback from You (yes, you): 9 Words That Describe the Nonprofit Arts Issues That Are Placing You at the End of Your Rope

rope

This blog, as most are, is pretty much one-way.  I share experiences, advice, consultation, and observations; you read ’em.  I can discuss 1,000 issues that affect nonprofit arts organizations.

But that’s me.

What keeps you up at night?

What concrete issue (not just “there’s no funding for…”) is fraying your rope?  Or better, what issues are figuratively tying a noose around the end of your rope?

Here’s your assignment.  In 9 words (no more, no less), write that issue and send it to info@137words.com.  That’s it.  Beginning in August, we’ll periodically take each issue and I’ll give my take.  Then we’ll open up the discussion to everyone who reads 137 Words.  Let me know if you’d like your name in or if you’d like to be anonymous.  And if you’d like my help privately, let me know that, too.

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The Paradox of Simplicity: Success Begins with Better, Not More

einstein-counting-on-fingers

There’s a saying that every weapon that’s been invented has been used.  Or will be.

Similarly, every technological advance of the last 30 years has been used.  Or will be.

More avenues of communication. More personalized offers.  More database data.  More news.  More marketing.  More music.  More art.  More words.

Not “better.”  “More.”

This is not code for “I’m old and yearn for a simpler time.”  I’m not and I don’t.  What I yearn for is a better time.

Regardless of how many ways key information is dispersed, some folks just don’t consume it.  And that’s on you.

I should know.  You may be engaging with this post (and thank you), but others who could, don’t.  And that’s on me.

A blown basketball pass is the passer’s fault.   But a bad pass isn’t solved with throwing more basketballs.

Ils pétent plus haut que leur cul. Marketing Intellectual Pursuits to an Anti-Intellectual Public, Right-Cheer In These You-Nited States of Murrica

Shakespeare Marx

In the arts, we want to attract more people. Or do we just want more us?

We’re asked to produce vision, impact, and engagement.  We embrace entertainment, but only if it’s at a 120+ IQ level.  Even abject silliness on stage is only acceptable if it’s “smart.”

Case in point:  the brilliantly entertaining, best-people-in-the-world-to-hang-out-with, fucking funny Reduced Shakespeare Company.

When another company produces an RSC script, they almost apologize in their marketing:

RSC: “it’s not the length of your history that matters – it’s what you’ve done with it!”

Other: “Between the rampant nationalism and the recent election, we think it more vital than ever for us to show we’re capable of laughing at ourselves. It, too, is part of the healing.”

Populism in the arts is an open path to success.  Risk being fucking funny, not drolly meaningful.

If You’re _____________, Then Your Nonprofit Arts Organization is Probably Unsustainable (with apologies to Jeff Foxworthy)

Single woman sitting lonely in an empty cinema or theatre

  • not paying your executive director because s/he is independently wealthy and actually donates 6 figures to the company;
  • working 70 hours/week every week and see nothing wrong with that;
  • hiring part-time employees and expecting them to work full-time free of charge;
  • of the belief that your employees are less important than your equipment or your building;
  • insisting that anyone besides your marketing director is the final word on your marketing;
  • keeping your artistic director away from donors because s/he doesn’t know how to interact with them;
  • in the mindset that any of your people are more important than any other of your people;
  • playing “Dialing for Dollars” to meet your payroll;
  • arguing that “keeping the base” is more important than expanding the audience, while…
  • thinking that you can do both;
  • sweating a little right now after reading this post.

There’s Not An App for That

I want to donate to your theatre, not your CRM

There are an endless number of costly, effective CRM systems for the arts.  One costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and it’s superb at what it does.

One might say, “It had better be.”

Before that expensive, expansive piece of software, there were others.  Some great at some things, some at others.

Not one of these pieces of software ever raised a dime.  People do that.

Not one of these pieces of software ever performed, exhibited, or created a compelling artistic experience.  People do that.

Not one of these pieces of software ever governed, advocated, cajoled, or counseled. People do that.

Before CRMs that cost various ulnae, fibulae, and tibiae, there were inexpensive off-the-shelf database software solutions.

Before that, we did it all on paper.

Millions attended.  Millions still do.

And the best relationships are still person-to-person.

Stop Kibbitzing Your Nonprofit Arts Marketers — They’re the Experts at What They Do (And You’re Probably Not)

art of marketing

Jerry Yoshitomi wrote a brilliant article last October.  And in learning and unlearning of audience development skills, all too often marketing people are brutally disrespected by the other areas of the organization.  I’ve heard marketing departments referred to as “a necessary evil” dozens of times.

Compare the following sentences:


“Anyone can market your arts organization.”

“Anyone can market your arts organization SUCCESSFULLY.”

“Anyone can act, paint, sing, dance, sculpt, direct, and play the tuba.”

“Anyone can act, paint, sing, dance, sculpt, direct, and play the tuba SUCCESSFULLY.”


Don’t be caught in ancient thinking.  Just because all consumers react to marketing doesn’t make them good marketers.  Treat marketers as you would treat other artists, because that’s what they are.  They are the best interpreters of your product to the public.  Don’t stand between them and your organization’s success.

Marketing the Arts, the Play-Doh® Fun Factory, and Marketman©

Marketman“Have a response to ‘If it’s a hit, it’s the art.  If it’s a bomb, it’s the marketing.’
It’ll keep you off death row.”
– Marketman©

Artistic events evolve.  The elements may be eons old, but the results continue to change.  With the squeeze of a contraption, like Play-Doh® in a Fun Factory, necessarily comes a different product.  Different from the time before.  Different from the next time.

This is a job for Marketman©, a copyrighted portion of this publication.  Marketman© (not necessarily male) is your company’s Sea Gal/Jay Carney/Don Draper/Rob Petrie.  Marketman© is charged with the task of launching a product to market, eliminating it, subsequently launching a new product.

Marketman© sells art, not tickets.  There is no lasting inventory, like month-old sodas on the shelf, when the new product is introduced.

Here.  Maybe this’ll help.

Nonprofit Arts Lingo Ready for Expunging…and Words to Use Instead

Subscription Season Tickets, Packages [“Subscription” = “Newspaper” = “Dying Industry”]

Audience Fans, Partners [Audiences hear, fans root, partners invest]

Watch Participate, Enjoy, Love [See “Audience”]

Us, we It, the [“We” requires “They”]

“Play a part” [Any non-cutesy non-cliche]

Spectacular, incredible, fabulous, gifted, talented, great, wonderful, delightful, fantastic, poignant, moving [Overused and does not describe the event – unless literally (big 3-ring circuses, for example, are spectacular); it also insults readers by dictating how they should feel]

Witty Funny, hilarious [“Witty” makes some feel as though the work is above their intellectual pay grade]

“Lost Ticket Insurance” [No one cares]

Engage, enlighten, educate Brighten, connect, involve [see “Witty”]

“Something for Everyone” [Never use this phrase. What your organization does is NOT for everyone; therefore, it’s a lie.  It also implies that your organization is profit-seeking.  Who would donate to McDonald’s?]

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